Friday, August 8, 2014

Corncob

Not certain of the value of what they call a Corncob. Which is the hard woody central core of a Maize ear.  There's a great deal of this core and it kind of looks useful, and I guess there are a whole lot of things to be done with it.  I'm told that if you want to make a pipe out of a Corncob, you have to let the Corncob dry for two years, and then it needs to be carved and lacquered, and the bit you pull smoke from is made of Pine, apparently. So that's all rather patient work, and the result is probably not good for you anyway.

Corncobs I feel very confident can be used as fuel for the Outdoor Stove, if they are left to dry long enough and are not carried off by bandits. But The Artist, who has a great deal more experience of these things than I, and who is a wealth of confusing and obviously technical expressions around the Maize plant, reckons that once the Corncob has been milked, it can be boiled up, the liquid reduced and the result is a thickening agent which if added to equal parts of sugar will produce a jelly that tastes like Honey. I guess, in due course and after some experimentation.......

3 comments:

Gin said...

Red cobs work best for this, and yes, they do produce a good jelly...if you like apple jelly.

tim candler said...

It was the thickening agent part that I thought interesting in the literature. Did you use pectin to make the jelly.

Gin said...

Yes, I used powdered pectin. It was so funny. My then mother-in-law wouldn't touch the jelly since it was made from red "cow corn" cobs. Cow corn (regular field corn raised to feed cows and hogs) was beneath her raisin'.