Sunday, October 12, 2014

"Twonk" in English Usage

How about "Wally Hammond" as a title. Mind you a person would have to be something like seventy five years old, still in possession of his or her faculties and an avid cricketer to know who Wally Hammond is or was. And the thing about Wally Hammond is that he was born in Kent, and when he was chosen to play Cricket for Gloucestershire, Lord Harris noted that Wally hadn't lived in Gloucestershire long enough to play cricket for the Gloucestershire County Cricket Team. And Wally had to play football for a while.

These days, Lord Harris would be what modern English Usage might call a "Twonk." In my view a beautiful word, that may one day indeed find its way across the Atlantic Ocean to meld into the imagination of other English Usage, American, Canadian and so on. For my part, I yearn to hear the word "Twonk" uttered by fellow citizens in the Grocery Store. Probably by a cashier or a cheerful bagger. And one day soon I plan to again visit a Grocery Store, but meanwhile I have a not so fond memory of having seen Wally Hammond's signed cricket bat on the wall of a headmaster's study.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Wonderful word....twouldn't think it would take hold with most "normal".

tim candler said...

Twill or it won't as long as it doesn't twine, I guess