Thursday, July 7, 2016

Lead Bulls and Stuff


There are many theories, but the thing about the Drums of the Acholi was they represented a higher consistency. Something reliable that did not move to the whims of something like an electorate, or the wiles of something like a politician, or the fear of something like hunger or unfairness. No matter the circumstance the drums always sounded the same, they were given their own hut, their own place to be and they were cared for. Sometime in the 1970's the Drums of the Acholi were stolen, probably sold to a far away collector The question where are these drums in our world as it is today.

You can sometimes see them in obedience to constitutions, hear them in a national anthem, observe them in the toll of a church bell or the call from a minaret or in the klaxon of a factory at the end of shift, you can feel them in the pin pricks of an economist's equations and yet for some of us the consistency of the drums has gone. The sound of them, the knowledge of them lost to uncertainty of tightropes and conjurors. Call it The Lead Bull of Socio-economic Development if you prefer. Follow him into the dark night, return again as a child if you're lucky. Me, I'm going to try and pickle this years crop of onions.

3 comments:

Gin said...

That sounds like a plan. If it works, I hope you'll share the process.

tim candler said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
tim candler said...

A fistful of sheep moment, Gin. What I meant to say was, I thought I'd start by reading By His Own Hand